Farmers’ Markets By Day of the Week

Yarden of Eatin'

Untitled design Photo Credit: Farmers’ Market of Keene

This Farmers’ Market Week, be sure to visit one (or more!) of our region’s Farmers’ Market.  There’s one almost every day of the week!

MONDAYS

Fresh Chicks Marketplace:

Monadnock Community Hospital northeast parking lot, Peterborough, Mon., May–Oct., 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, flowers/plants, dairy, maple, baked goods, meat, crafts. Rain or shine.

Team Jaffrey Community Farmers Market:

Jaffrey Common, Mon., June-Sept., 3-6 p.m.

Winchester Farmers Market on Main:

Gazebo Area next to the Conant Public Library, Mon., June-Oct., 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

TUESDAYS

Farmers’ Market of Keene:

Summer Market is on Gilbo Ave from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The market will be held Tuesdays and Saturdays through October. SNAP/EBT accepted. The market offers a great selection of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, meat, eggs, preserves, wines, and maple products. Bakers are also present selling breads, cookies, granola, and…

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Monadnock Food Co-op Declares “We Are Still In”

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The Monadnock Food Co-op has declared, “We are still in.” The co-op joins over 1,000 U.S. governors, mayors, businesses, investors, and colleges and universities, declaring their intent to continue to ensure the U.S. remains a global leader in reducing carbon emissions. The Co-op joins many businesses nationwide who have signed the agreement, as well as several others who have joined in the Monadnock Region.

Together, these leaders are sending a strong signal to the international community and the 194 other parties to the Paris Agreement about the continued commitment of the United States to ambitious action on climate change. In the aggregate, the signatories are delivering concrete emissions reductions that will help meet America’s emissions pledge under the Paris Agreement.

The Monadnock Food Co-op believes the Paris Agreement is a blueprint for stability, global health and prosperity, and that accelerating the United States’ clean energy transition is an opportunity to create jobs, spur innovation, and promote trade. By declaring that “We are still in,” the signatories are putting the best interests of their constituents, customers, students and communities first while assuring the rest of the world that American leadership on climate change extends well beyond the federal government.

Climate change is already impacting farmers and producers in the Monadnock Region as well as farmers globally, including producers that supply the co-op with consumer favorites like coffee, chocolate and bananas, among others.

“As a retail grocery store, the Monadnock Food Co-op cares deeply about continuing to supply our community with high-quality food, grown as sustainably as possible,” said Michael Faber, the Co-op’s General Manager. “Our Ends Statements, including promoting a healthy, sustainable food system, the support of farmers and producers and a strong, sustainable and improving local economy mandate we must continue to take action to reduce emissions locally and globally.”

To view the full statement, quotes and list of signatories, visit: http://www.wearestillin.com/.

Complete Economy Project Reaches Out to Stakeholders

By Nicole Colson, Originally Published in New Hampshire Business Review

A Monadnock Region initiative aimed at adopting policies designed to level the playing field for locally owned businesses is being developed in hopes it will serve as a statewide model.

The Complete Economy Project, spearheaded by Monadnock Buy Local, is an effort by citizens to create a regional economy by implementing policies and practices that balances diverse types of business by putting them on equal footing. The effort was launched last fall.

Monadnock Buy Local is a grassroots network of citizens, businesses and organizations that promotes the economic and community benefits of spending locally, while supporting programs and policies that support a local, green and fair economy.

Stakeholders will decide what policies should be created –for example, better access to broadband, more composting and less trash removal or more hospitals and municipalities buying from locally-owned businesses.

Those are only a few ideas – at this point, there is no focus on one business idea or sector to make the economy stronger. Instead the organization, which is working with the city of Keene, is looking at data that shows how well the local economy is operating and whether certain policies that don’t make sense need to be ruled out.

The movement needs stakeholders and partners to help implement the ideas. Possible partners in consideration are the local Small Business Development Center, chamber of commerce and regional planning commission among other economic development groups and independent business owners.

Effective strategies

Stacy Mitchell, economy researcher and author from the Portland, Maine, office of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance – a national nonprofit that researches, analyzes and partners with communities and policymakers to design and implement policies to strengthen local economies – gave a presentation earlier this month for potential stakeholders at Antioch University New England. The purpose of her appearance was to share effective strategies focused on national local economy policies and to gain community support for the Monadnock project.

Mitchell gave an overall picture of local economies across the country and how they are affected by monopolies. Her institute’s research found that $1 of every $2 spent online today goes to Amazon; at the same time, for every job gained at Amazon, two jobs are lost at a brick-and-mortar store.

But at a time when online retail giants are forcing brick-and-mortar businesses to shutter, the buy local movement continues to gain traction. One example is the re-emergence of independent booksellers – 660 new stores opened in the country over the past seven years.

And a recent impact study of the Monadnock Region found locally owned businesses return four times more money to the local economy compared to chain retailers.

Independent businesses saw a 5.1 percent increase in sales in 2014 (vs. a 2.3 percent increase in 2013) according to the latest national survey conducted by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in partnership with the Advocates for Independent Business, which gathered data from 3,000 locally-owned business.

The same Monadnock Region impact study notes if every area resident shifted just 10 percent of their purchases from national chains to locally owned retailers, it would keep $27 million annually recirculating in the local economy, generating more jobs, charitable donations and community health.

Among the strategies Mitchell said help strengthen local economies are growing local banks, creating a local investment fund, adopting business diversity policies and supporting buy local first initiatives.

Monadnock Buy Local serves as an example of these kinds of initiatives in that the organization has created partnerships with other local business alliances to instill a Plaid Friday and Shift Your Shopping Campaign every holiday season to encourage spending at locally owned and independent businesses.

Stakeholder outreach

The organization used Smart Growth America’s Complete Streets program as inspiration for the Complete Economy Project and plans to adapt its framework to turn the project into a movement. Complete Streets, a successful program in the Monadnock Region, advocates for policies and practices that ensure safe streets for all. Smart Growth America’s leadership team supports the idea and wants to stay connected as it’s developed.

Monadnock Buy Local received a grant from the New England Grassroots Environment Fund to support the Complete Economy project. The first phase of work consisted of creating an outreach plan for stakeholders.

“It’s important to reach out to partners and determine what measureables they’re looking at,” said Jennifer Risley, executive director of marketing and event planning with Monadnock Buy Local. “We’re working together to come up with a baseline as something we can measure each year to see how we’re doing before jumping into any one policy.”

This summer, those stakeholders will review case studies, develop and implement the first policy to advocate. If the project is successful, the city will adopt the policy, followed by many others that support the local living economy. The goal is to share this model with other communities.

There is no limit to the number of partners for the project, and Risley hopes many will get involved.

“We need to use our collective power,” she said.

Cultivating a Local Economy that Works for All

Monadnock Buy Local will host “The Complete Economy Project: Cultivating a Local Economy That Works for All” Event with local economy researcher and author Stacy Mitchell on Thursday, May 4, 2017 from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Antioch University New England in Keene, NH.  Stacy will discuss effective strategies that communities around the country are using to grow local businesses and how public policy needs to change to create an economy that works for all.

Stacy Mitchell is co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, a national nonprofit organization that produces research and analysis, and partners with communities and policymakers to design and implement policies that curb economic consolidation and strengthen local economies.  Her book Big-Box Swindle appeared on several top-ten lists and was described by Bill McKibben as “the ultimate account of the single most important economic trend in our country.” She has also written for a wide range of publications, including Business Week, The Nation and Wall Street Journal, and has authored several influential reports.  More about her work is available at ilsr.org/stacy-mitchell.

The Complete Economy Project supports the adoption of local policies that level the playing field for locally owned businesses in our region and spark innovative business models that contribute to our local living economy.  It cultivates a regional economy that works for more people and balances the needs of diverse types of business.

“Cultivating locally owned businesses is one of the best strategies for creating jobs, reducing inequality and building a more resilient community.  I’m excited to share our research and talk about ways that the Monadnock Region can apply this approach to economic development,” said Mitchell.

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You’re Invited: The Local Crowd Monadnock Launch Party

tlcm-final-rgb-updatedStonewall Farm in Keene will host The Local Crowd Monadnock’s Launch Party on Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.   The event includes food samples, children’s activity stations and hayrides.  Also, this event is free that is open to the public. 

The Local Crowd (TLC) Monadnock is a locally based crowdfunding platform that empowers individuals to support the businesses, organizations and initiatives that grow wealthier and healthier communities in the region.  Crowdfunding, or the practice of raising funds to support a project from a large number of people, is a viable alternative to recruiting businesses from outside the region to boost economic activity.

This project is part of a two-year research study funded by a USDA Small Business Innovation Research grant to gauge this platform’s effectiveness in rural areas.  During its pilot phase, TLC Monadnock will only accept campaign proposals from businesses, organizations or community initiatives based in Keene, Chesterfield, Hinsdale, Swanzey or Winchester.  TLC Monadnock will give preference to campaigns from these communities that also align with their respective city or town’s master plan and contribute to a local, green and fair economy.

TLC Monadnock will officially launch online on March 15, 2017 with two campaigns focused on sustainable agriculture: Archway Farm’s “Farm to Table on Wheels” project and Stonewall Farm’s “Barn Raising” project.  Supporting sustainable agriculture is a prominent part of Keene’s Comprehensive Master Plan.

“TLC Monadnock is about us — our region, our community — and the goals we’ve created around economic development and prosperity,” said Jen Risley, Monadnock Buy Local Executive Director.  “We invite everyone to become a campaign supporter — it doesn’t matter where you live.”

TLC Monadnock is a collaboration of regional economic development organizations working to cultivate a stronger ecosystem of investors, service providers and local economy champions.  A team of community leaders from Southwest Region Planning Commission, Monadnock Buy Local, New Hampshire Small Business Development Center, Greater Keene Chamber of Commerce, Monadnock Economic Development Corporation and Hannah Grimes Center manages this crowdfunding platform.

Discover more details and updates at monadnocklocal.org/tlclaunch or contact Jen Risley at jen@monadnocklocal.org or 603-499-7950.

From Hurricane to Climate Change

“According to environmentalist and author Bill McKibben, ‘Climate change is actually the biggest thing that’s going on every single day.’ In response, the Monadnock Institute of Nature, Place and Culture at Franklin Pierce University, with support from New Hampshire Humanities, has produced a documentary film focused on climate change adaptation and resiliency in New Hampshire’s Monadnock region.” – New Hampshire Humanities